Author Archives: Jay Banks

Vancouver Film Locations: Downtown

As we already demonstrated with documenting the TV history of the popular Marine Building and Robson Square, Vancouver is very popular among TV producers.

For this article, we took a look at Downtown and some of the iconic buildings that appeared across TV shows and movies.

Battlestar Galactica

Did you know new Battlestar Galactica used to shoot in Vancouver? One of the very prominent Downtown buildings featured in the series is the Vancouver Public Library. It's a portrayal of Caprica in all its glory.

 

Another great place is the roof of Pub 340, where the colourful graffiti mural become a great background for some of the very dramatic scenes. We wouldn't advise climbing on the roof just to check if we're telling the truth. Have a look at our photos instead!

 

Neverending Story

Who doesn't love 90's family movies and their naive vibe? Neverending Story is one of those movies you can watch on repeat and discover something new every time. The story of Bastian reading a fairytale book where he ends up being the hero became a cult favourite. But did you ever notice the parts of the movie taking place in real life were filmed in Vancouver? You can clearly see the Dominion Building in the wide shot.

 

A good example is the mysterious Library where Bastian ends up hiding after a group of bullies chases him through the city. In real life, it's the Local Public Eatery. So no, you can't go there and hide in the attic to read a book, hoping you get to ride your own Luck Dragon.

 

Speaking of Falcor, the scene in the alley where Bastian gets back at the kids that bullied him is just down the street. Remember that red trash can? Sadly, it's not there anymore, so no more throwing kids into the garbage.

 

 

Arrow

You probably know that the American broadcaster The CW loves Vancouver, especially to use as their own personal DC universe. Arrow, Flash and Supergirl were all shot in Vancouver at some point and of course, they had to visit Downtown.

 

When Arrow was only taking its first steps to become the beloved TV show it is now, Oliver had a list of people he needs to eliminate. In the episode Salvation in the first season, this vigilante vengeance craze leads him to one of the buildings at 23rd & Myra only to find nothing. Oh yes, that's a friendly reminder that Mr Queen wasn't always the total superhero at the beginning. Such a throwback, right?

The Flash

Continuing with our exploration fo the DC universe, we have to mention The Flash. Back in the first season, when Iris decided she wants to be a reporter, the gang meats the lovely Linda Park, a reporter for Central City Picture News. Barry, being the dorky boy he is, falls for her and they end up dating briefly, which as we know more often than not results in a good chance of seeing double. Or rather seeing your double?

 

Yes, Linda is one of the few people in the Flash series that has an evil double. Actually as it seems, every girl Flash has ever dated has one. How convenient. Talk about revenge of the exes.

 

And since the charming person on Earth 2 nicknamed Dr. Light decides that the real Linda Parks is very inconvenient to her, she decides to get rid of her and storms Central City Picture News. Of course, Barry saves the day and everybody lives happily ever after until the next episode.

 

Conveniently, the Central City Picture News Building is located at Abbott Street here in Vancouver. Through the series, we get a few good shots of the building and we can see that they even left the original address 134 Abbott Street in the show.

 

21 Jump Street

This classic 80' procedural cop show aired on FOX and become a very popular piece of TV history. So much, that they decided to adapt and remake it into a (currently well-known) movie with the same name.

 

The story focused on a group of young-looking police officers posing as students in high schools and colleges to help investigate crimes happening on campuses. The name 21 Jump Street is also an address of their headquarters. One of the other addresses in the series is an apartment of one of the heroes - Officer Douglas "Doug" Penhall, with a Vancouver address 307 West Cordova Street.

 

In the episode The Dragon & The Angel, the whole team is seated in front of the familiar and very loved statue of John 'Gassy Jack' Deighton in Gastown. In the shot, you can clearly see only the pedestal and the oak barrel upon which the statue stands, but it's enough to recognize one of the most photographable landmarks in Gastown.

 

KVRVKV

Vancouver Guide: What to Do in Bad Weather

When the weather in Vancouver is good, it’s great; but when it is bad, it is grey, wet and chilly. Thankfully, there are plenty of fun places to go to pass a rainy day in Vancouver without staying on your couch. 

Visit one of the galleries

The Vancouver Art Gallery, located downtown just off Robson Street, usually has several different exhibits open. You can roam its otherworldly white halls and see fascinating artworks, both historical and contemporary, in traditional and modern media, and from around the world. Future shows in 2018 include a review of modern Japanese painter Takashi Murakami, and the Bombhead exhibition that explores the impact of the nuclear age on art and society. You can get a deal on admission by buying an individual or household annual membership, which includes free gallery admission and entry to many events. The gallery also has admission by donation on Tuesdays after 5pm. 

Vancouver Art Gallery by Timothy Neesam

Also downtown, the Contemporary Gallery is a non-profit space for contemporary visual art. There are regular tours of the gallery space with artists and curators (in multiple languages), and talks on anything from textile art to cultural accessibility and human rights. 

Tucked into a Chinatown storefront, Access Gallery is an artist-run, non-profits pace that aims to show more provocative visual art. One of their past shows was "Twenty-Three Days At Sea", showing the works created by artists in residence aboard a cargo container ship traveling from Shanghai to Vancouver. The gallery is open Tuesday to Sunday. 

Discover that science is fun - in Science World

Across the street from the Main Street Skytrain station, Telus World of Science is full of educational exhibits about many different sciences, for adults and kids. Bodyworks explores our bodies down to the cellular level. At Living Lab, you can work directly with UBC researchers who are studying cognitive development. You can do hands-on engineering experiments at Tinkering Space. The five-storey high screen in the OMNIMAX theatre makes documentaries, like Amazon Adventure and A Beautiful Planet into visually stunning, immersive experiences. 

Vancouver Science World by Franco Ng

Enjoy a concert or a play

Built in 1927, the Orpheum Theatre is a monument to design, with sweeping staircases, a domed auditorium with a ceiling mural and a giant crystal chandelier It hosts shows like the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra’s New Music festival, stand up comedy stars, a Beatles tribute called Classical Mystery Tour, family-oriented explorations of classical music through legends and fairy tales, food tastings as part of Dine Out Vancouver, and orchestral and choir performances. 

Orpheum Theatre by Colin Knowles

Just a few doors from the Orpheum on downtown Granville, the Art Deco-style Commodore Ballroom is coming up on its own 90th anniversary. This Vancouver landmark has survived many musical eras, and shut down a few times, only to be revived a few years later. It’s hosted musical stars from all over the world, as well as local bands and fund-raiser events. The huge venue has a dance floor and concert stage, tiered seating, and a fully equipped commercial kitchen and service staff for food and beverage. 

Also downtown, the Queen Elizabeth Theatre is a dramatic venue for everything from orchestral music to opera to stand up comedy to touring Broadway musicals. It’s home to Ballet BC, Vancouver Opera and Broadway Across Canada. 

Watch classic and new films 

When you’ve run out of things to watch online,you can go to an independent theatres such as the Pacific Cinematheque, the Rio Theatre, and the Vancouver International Film Centre which have diverse schedules of classic, foreign and cult films. Note that you have to pay a modest fee for a membership at the Pacific and the VIFC. The Rio also does live performances, like burlesque shows, The Gentlemen Hecklers, who do comedic commentary on bad movies, and The Critical Hit Show, which merges improv comedy with Dungeons and Dragons, with audience members invited on stage to play monsters. 

Rio Theatre by Kyle Pearce

The many branches of the Vancouver Public Library provide lectures, readings, workshops on coding and media, and screenings of features films and documentaries, some of them family-friendly. 

Shop local in one of the indoor markets

Greater Vancouver has a few indoor markets where you can browse a wide variety of shops and food venues while staying warm and dry.

Take a quick Seabus trip from downtown across Vancouver harbour and visit LonsdaleQuay Market in North Vancouver. Directly connected to the Seabus terminal, it’s more than 80 shops and services, including clothing, wine, accessories, leather goods,and a food court and two restaurants.

Vancouver Granville Island Market by IQRemix

Granville Island Public Market, beneath the Granville Street bridge and reached from the Kitsilano neighbourhood, is an old industrial space that has been converted into an open market. Most of it is devoted to gourmet foods, offering fresh local seafood, meats and poultry, sausages and deli meats, fresh local fruits and vegetables, cheeses, chocolates, and pastas. If you really want to know your way around, book with Vancouver Foodie Tours and enjoy more than twenty food tastings. For lunch and snacks, take your pick from bagels baked in a flame oven, fudge, pastries, muffins, and donuts. The rest of the area includes many other shops, restaurants and theatres. 

Relax in Vancouver's swimming pools

Funny how we hate cold water outdoors, but we immerse ourselves in warm water indoors. The best way to pay for visits to swimming pools, ice rinks and fitness centres is the Vancouver Park Board OneCard. You can get a card for free at any centre and load it with passes online. If you’re particularly extravagant, you can reserve a lane or an entire pool by the hour. 

Located near Queen Elizabeth Park, the Hillcrest Aquatic Centre is the largest aquatic facility in Vancouver, built for the 2010 Olympics. You can splash around in the leisure pool, swim lengths, or participate in an aquafit class. 

Swimming in Vancouver by Cara

Another city-run swimming pool is the Vancouver Aquatic Centre, locate in a bunker-like building near Sunset Beach. The huge, naturally-lit main pool has fifty-metre lap lanes and diving towers up to ten metres. You can also heat up in the sauna, cool down in the whirlpool, or exercise in the weight room. It’s wheelchair accessible and has universal change rooms. 

Downtown, you can go to the Robert Lee YMCA Pool. There are open swim times, and teen and adult swimming lessons are included in your membership. You can also check out many fitness activities such as yoga, pilates, cycling, and cardio dance. 

Recently rebuilt, the UBC Aquatic Centre can hold nearly 1,000 bathers, with a fifty-metre competition pool and a twenty-five-metre recreational pool, a steam room, a sauna and a hot tub. The facility is built to be as accessible as possible, with power-operated doors, Braille signage, male, female and universal change rooms, and access ramps in the pools. You can drop in to many different exercise and fitness classes. There are drop-in fees or membership passes. 

Cozy up at a café

If you don’t want to go home right after your day trip, Vancouver has many cozy places to pass a chilly, damp afternoon with a cup of something hot. 

Platform7 has two locations, one in East Vancouver and one in Kitsilano, modelled after 19th century British and French train stations. Each has three bars, one for espresso creations, one for single-origin coffees from around the world, and one for cold brews, plus locally-sourced baked goods and sandwiches.

Coffee in Vancouver by Kenny Louie

Aperture lies on West Broadway, three blocks from Cambie Street, and doubles as a gallery space. The gourmet cookies are hand made by the Cannele & Honeybun bakery. 

49thParallel, with locations on Thurlow Street downtown, Main Street and West 4th, is for the dedicated coffee lover. You can get your own coffee brewing kits, coffee machines, cups, branded apparel and other paraphernalia, so you can enjoy this kind of coffee at home. If you’re serious about your coffee, the website includes details about growing region, elevation, variety and harvest year for each type sold, and detailed instructions on proper brewing. The subscription plans will bring selected packages of filter coffee and espresso to your home on a regular schedule. They make Lucky’s doughnuts on site, and the Thurlow location also has a brunch and lunch menu. 

Experience beer tasting

Granville Island Brewing, located near the Public Market, does multiple tours and tastings each day of the week, and afterwards you can enjoy a drink with food pairings in the taproom. 

You can explore Vancouver’s brewing community in more depth with Vancouver Brewery Tours. They’ll take you and your group to three different breweries and distilleries in three different neighbourhoods, teaching you about craft spirits, beer brewing, and barrel aging. On dryer days during the summer, you can do the walking tour of three breweries in three hours. 

Granville Island Brewery Samples by Conrad Olson

PTDTSK

Photo Essay: Vancouver’s Holiday Lights

Whether we have snow or not, there is one thing that can't be missing every holiday season besides the many ice-skating rinks and Markets to get you in the festive mood; the colourful decorations all over the city! Vancouver lights up its parks, the shopping centers certainly don't hold back and everyone living in Vancouver and its suburbs wants to have the nicest front yard of the street. Holiday lights are, however, not just about beautiful views and thousands of twinkling lights: they can also serve a good cause by supporting a charity. Where to see the City's most beautiful holiday lights? See a selection of our favourite places in this photo essay!

VanDusen Festival of Lights

Where: VanDusen Botanical Garden, 5151 Oak Street
When: December 1 - January 7

The VanDusen Botanical Garden is worth visiting every time of the year - but it is particularly magical in the winter season! In 1994, a small part of the garden was turned into a beacon of light. Since then, the VanDusen Festival of Lights became the City's most popular and longest running Christmas attraction.

The 15 acres area is decorated with more than one million lights - and not only literally. A group of volunteers check the bulbs each year and it takes months to create this beautiful winter wonderland. This is the perfect place to take beautiful photos, watch the dancing lights show on Livingstone Lake or simply enjoy a walk with a hot drink in your hands. You can also contribute to a good cause by supporting the Make-A-Wish Foundation, which works to grant the wishes of kids with life-threatening illnesses by lighting a candle at the Candle Grotto.

The VanDusen Festival of Lights features several themed areas and runs from December 1 to January 7.

Stanley Park and the Bright Lights

Where: Pipeline Road in Stanley Park, via the West Georgia Street park entrance
When: November 30 - January 6

One of the biggest parks in Vancouver, Stanley Park, lights up with almost three million twinkling lights during the holiday season. Which is really nice, considering how early it gets dark this time of the year! When you enter the park, it feels like you're entering a fairy tale: this is the best place to take children in December to see holiday decorations and illuminations in the Lower Mainland. Some of the popular features are the miniature train with a ride full of breathtaking displays, and live performers along the route, Santa’s Workshop or the craft hut. 

Bright Nights has been running at Stanley Park since 1997 annually from the end of November until the beginning of January. Admission is by donation with proceeds benefiting the BC Professional Fire Fighters Burn Fund. $1.4 million has been raised to help burn survivors and their families since 1998.

Lights of Hope

Where: St. Paul’s Hospital, 1081 Burrard Street
When: November 16 - January 8

Every year, over 100,000 bulbs and hundreds of sponsored stars illuminate the St. Paul's Hospital as part of Light of Hope, St. Paul's Foundation's campaign raising funds for the hospital’s most immediate patient care and equipment needs. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the campaign that raised more than $31 million since its launch in 1998. The installation opens each year in mid-November with a festive, family friendly launch event featuring fireworks and live entertainment, taking place outdoors the hospital.

Lights of Hope brings hundreds of thousands of visitors to see the beautiful light tunnels and the building lit up with stars from top to bottom. The iconic installation, which is built by volunteers using donated materials, features over 10 kilometres of lights. The Lights of Hope is shining from dusk till dawn until January 8th.

Light a Life - Canuck Place 

Where: 1690 Matthews Avenue 
When: December 7 - December 31

Canuck Place Children’s Hospice annually lights the hospice and surrounding gardens. by 60,000 lights that are installed over a period of one month. These lights represent the spirit of care and support 

This event has been a wonderful tradition since the Canucks Place opened in 1995 and is a celebration of the donations given towards the hospice's care to children, however, this isn't the only way to get involved: during the holiday season, anyone can contribute to the hospice through the Light a Life campaign. 

While the Hospice is decorated to bring joy to the children and families and isn’t open to the public, you can enjoy the lights from outside the gates.

Meet The Photographer: Ricardo Vacas

Ricardo VacasRicardo Vacas

Ricardo Vacas, owner of the firm Kerp Photography, always showed intense interest in many forms of creative arts. His professional photography career started in his home country, Spain, where he was the official photographer of several music bands, models and clothing brands. He decided to move to Wellington, New Zealand in 2012, knowing his real interest was fashion photography more than any other field. Currently living in Vancouver, Canada, he now combines his fashion, editorial and commercial photography projects with regular trips to Europe and USA.

DTRVSK

Vancouver Restaurants With the Longest Tradition: Roundel Cafe

The Roundel Cafe is a small storefront in the middle of the block in East Vancouver’s Hastings-Sunrise neighbourhood, an area that retains an old-neighbourhood feel. Inside, the décor is old-style diner with stools facing the counter and booths along the wall. Leonard Cohen sings on the speakers. There are no video screens anywhere. Dena Sananin is the Roundel's co-owner and co-manager:

Our cafe thrives on personality. It’s individual. It’s a cross-section of the neighbourhood of where we live, inside and out. We’ve never really tried to be any particular style,

Sananin and her partner Mick took over the management in 2006, but the the Roundel had existed in one form or another for decades.

Previously, the building was a kitchen even before that. The story is that apparently this building is quite old and was a kitchen for Jack Diamond.

Jack Diamond was a Jewish immigrant from Poland who came to Canada as a young man in the 1920s, and became a businessman and philanthropist. He bought the Pacific Meat Company in 1940 and expanded it into the largest meat packing house in the province. He raised money for the completion of the roof of Empire Stadium for the British Empire Games in 1954. He was involved in the Variety Club, the BC Heart Foundation, and other charitable organisations. His love of horse racing made him the owner and operator of the race track at Exhibition Park. Diamond’s efforts were recognised by the Order of Canada in 1979, and the Order of British Columbia in 1991.

This kitchen became the Roundel Cafe in 1964, owned by Bea Wong and her husband. Wong managed it for 15-20 years alone after her husband died.

In 2006, Dena and her partner Mick purchased it from Bea Wong. Neither of them had much experience in the restaurant business, but Dena realised that her job as a camera assistant was not compatible with raising children. She had worked in some cafes and restaurants before, and was familiar with the area and the establishment. This could be her new career.

My family has a lot of roots in this neighbourhood. As a child and pretty much my whole life, I have walked past this cafe, and have always had a connection with the space. I’d fantasised about having this space and running a cafe out of it. I took a chance and asked the owner if she was willing to sell. She was.

Dena freely admits she entered into this project not knowing what she was getting herself into. The extensive renovation proved to be a challenge.

We added some things to the kitchen. We put a new floor in. We took the drop ceiling out. We covered the wood paneling walls. We changed the lighting, which ended up being a disaster. Don’t ever install track lighting directly to a ceiling.

Under the new management, the Roundel Cafe’s menu offers what might be called "new diner": familiar North American dishes, but made with higher quality ingredients and with an eye to healthy choices.

Though it is no longer open in the evenings, the Roundel has a full range of breakfast and lunch dishes. Breakfast includes gluten-free organic corn pancakes and quinoa bowls and free-range egg dishes. For lunch, there are organic beef, free-range chicken, pork or tofu burgers. Instead of anything deep fried, there are side orders of salad, roast potatoes or brown rice.

The menu includes plenty of vegetarian and gluten-free options, as well as what Dena calls "vegan-ish" dishes, as they don’t have separate kitchen facilities for true vegan cooking. The cafe also has a liquor license and offers beer, cocktails and spiked milkshakes.

Maintaining a policy of quality, local food has proven to be a challenge, but it means that the Roundel has deep ties to its neighbourhood. "We use a lot of West View bakery, a local bakery. We get all our sausage and ham from a friend across the street at a Polish sausage shop." This gives her strong control over the quality of her supplies, though her establishment was never explicitly all-organic. "That wasn’t anything that we advertised, just more of an inner experiment to see if you could do that."

Later, circumstances forced her to amend her policies on organic foods.

I wasn’t buying enough product to continue to be able to shop from the warehouse I was buying form. I would go and personal shop and buy small amounts. They changed how they operated and I couldn’t shop there anymore. In any case, we decided we could do organic consistently where we can. Coffee, tea, ground beef, all the grains, that kind of thing. It’s more the bulk, the structure of the meals, and not the extras.

The Roundel Cafe has served the neighbourhood clientele for several years with no particular high concept. For example, they serve drinks in mason jars.

We’ve been using mason jars as glasses for years. We started doing that because my glasses kept breaking, and I could buy mason jars down the road at the corner store. It was all about convenience. I found it kind of funny when I remembered hearing someone say, ‘Mason jars are really trendy these days.’

The sample meal was the Blue Goose 70 Mile House organic beef burger. The beef patty has a juicy, meaty flavour, and the lettuce, red onion and tomato are fresh and tasty. Unlike the hamburgers at many upgraded diners, the Roundel’s features a substantial whole wheat bun with sesame seeds, which greatly adds to the texture for a satisfying bite. No flimsy white-bread buns here. No French fries, either; the Roundel doesn’t have a deep fryer. Instead there’s a helping of roasted potatoes and yams, light and tasty, alongside a small green salad.

Dena recommends adding their home-made ketchup or hot sauce. The hot sauce in particular should satisfy those who like heat in their meals.

Meet The Photographer: Ricardo Vacas

Ricardo VacasRicardo Vacas

Ricardo Vacas, owner of the firm Kerp Photography, always showed intense interest in many forms of creative arts. His professional photography career started in his home country, Spain, where he was the official photographer of several music bands, models and clothing brands. He decided to move to Wellington, New Zealand in 2012, knowing his real interest was fashion photography more than any other field. Currently living in Vancouver, Canada, he now combines his fashion, editorial and commercial photography projects with regular trips to Europe and USA.

PTRVSK

 

Vancouver Film Locations: Robson Square

If you are a DC's superheroes aficionado, you are probably familiar with Robson Square and you don't even know about it. This Downtown plaza is very popular over at CW's production for shooting action sequences.

This Vancouver Plaza was a prominent part of the city ever since it was built in the 1980s. It houses the Provincial Law Courts, some of the government office buildings and partly the University of British Columbia. The plaza includes an outdoor skating ring with a modern glass ceiling in the lower level and three waterfalls that provide natural air-conditioning during hot months. With a marvelous space as this one, it's really no surprise film-makers love the place so much.

Here are the most popular TV show and movies that were filmed at Robson Square since its opening: 

Supergirl

Ladies first, so let's talk about the lady of CW'S DC family who found its home in Vancouver. Supergirl is a story of Kara - Superman's cousin, who was sent to Earth to guide him. By accident she lands way after he becomes a superhero. Not having any obligations to look after him anymore, she got adopted by a nice family, hid her identity and lived a happy life. Until now.

 

In episode 22 of the second season, Kara has to face a choice: to get rid of all the Daxamites terrorizing the Earth, but sacrifice her boyfriend Mon-El in the process, or let the Daxamites plunder her city while she comes up with a better solution. But it all gets a bit more complicated when Daxamites brainwash her cousin Superman and he tries to kill Kara. Fun, huh?

 

Their epic fight happens to take place on Robson Square, right in the middle of the fountain. So you have a water-drenched mad Kara Danvers winning over Superman in a blink of an eye because she has no time for distractions. The scene is packed with action to the fullest and Robson Square humbly takes the beating. 

 

The Flash

His name is Bary Allen and he is the fastest man alive. If you watched at least one episode of the series, you know the drill. He runs fast, his home is Central City and lightning gave him abs once. The Flash (played by Grant Gustin you may know from Glee) is another DC superhero who found his home on CW's network.

 

The Flash filming in Vancouver is a given by now. They love Vancouver so much, they feature various buildings as re-ocurring sets through the series. Robson Square plays an important part of Flash's home-town Central City as the Central City Square.

 

In the Christmas episode (2x09) Trickster (played by Star Wars very own Mark Hamill) dresses up as Santa Claus and hands Christmas presents to children at the Central City Square. But they don't call him Trickster for nothing. His neatly wrapped presents turn to be very special. Yes, they were bombs. Before all the happy kids and our beloved Robson Square have a chance to blow up, Flash shows up and saves the day with some help of our favorite anti-hero Lenny Snart. What a champ.

 

Legends of Tomorrow 

Take a bunch of misfits-turned-superhumans from DC's Flash, put them in a time-travelling spaceship piloted by Arthur Darvill (you may know him as the ever-dying Rory from Doctor Who, but he finally got his own TARDIS here) and you have a perfect group of people for a quirky show. After Avengers' huge success, superhero groups started popping all over the place as DC is trying so hard to have at least one hit in their portfolio of huge misses. But they have yet to succeed.

 

Legends of Tomorrow is a story about a time agent from the future called Rip Hunter who goes back in time to recruit a very colourful superhero/rogue group to help him save the future and his family. They are travelling back and forth in time while hunting the villain Vandal Savage who wants to take over the world. With a name like that, nobody's surprised. There's something seriously wrong with how they name kids in the future.

 

Robson Square is featured in the thirteenth episode of the first season. In this episode, the group travels to the future, just before Savage kills Rip's family, and they try to stop him. Needless to say, they don't succeed, since there are more episodes to come. They have a not-so-great time at Robson Square, where Savage is raising an army and giving a very alluring speech. Think 1944 Nazi Germany complete with rows of brain-washed soldiers and an evil man with funny accent screaming into the microphone.

 

The X-Files

Scully, you are not gonna believe this, but aliens did land in Vancouver! Ok, not quite, but David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson did walk the same path you might be walking on every day on your way to work. X-files is a cult classic about two FBI agents investigating paranormal cases and if you haven't seen any episodes, it's very likely you've been living under a rock.

 

The series introduced nine seasons running from 1993 to 2002 and later spawned two movies. In 2015 Fox decided to bring back the beloved characters with season 10 and revive the old filming locations in Vancouver which appeared in the early seasons of the show.

 

Scully meets her old colleague Monica Reyes in the last episode of season 10 at Robson Square which in this case represents the Washington Square for the purposes of the show. They chat about their "old friend" Cigarette Smoking Man who is -spoilers- alive after the debacle in New Mexico. The episode ends with a cliffhanger the size of New Mexico itself, so it's not that surprising they started filming in Vancouver again for a new season this April.

 

Fringe

Staying in the sci-fi & FBI related Fox shows, Fringe is a bit like X-files meets science fair and Doctor Who. The plot tells a story of a fictional Fringe Division, which uses questionable science to investigate paranormal phenomenon & parallel universes. The whole plot revolves around the mad scientist Walter who was previously hospitalized for his dodgy experiments, his son Peter and FBI agent Olivia, who is in charge of the investigations and keeping the two guys sane.

 

In season four, Robson Square is used as Boston Plaza where the time-travelling Observers gather to discuss one of their own currently dying. It's a blink-and-you-miss-it moment, not a recurring set, but the style of the ice ring fits perfectly with the cold and futuristic theme of the series.

 

Shoot to Kill (Deadly Pursuit)

When a killer on the loose escapes to the mountains and infiltrates a group of hikers, cranky FBI agent is forced to team up with a mountain guide to catch him. Sidney Poitier as the city-dwelling FBI agent Warren Stantin and Tom Berenger as the wilderness guide Jonathan Knox are a great duo, providing a bit of comic relief in the otherwise action-packed movie.

 

The movie ends with the killer escaping through the mountains to Canada, namely to Vancouver. Stantin then stakes out at Robson Square to find him and this starts a very dramatically-sequenced gun chase through Downtown.

 

 

The Interview

The Interview is a crazy comedy telling a story of a tabloid talk-show host who wants more from his life. He wants to cover real news. He is in luck when Kim Jong-un reveals he is a big fan and invites him for an interview. It looks simple at first, but it soon becomes more complicated, when CIA agents show up at his door, asking him to assassinate Kim.

 

Robson Square plays the role of the Korean Presidential Palace in the movie. It undergoes heavy altering by the film crew. You'll be searching for that warm and welcoming feeling of this plaza for a long time after looking at the shots, but it's there. Unfortunately, the only thing that stayed the same are the stairs.

Tomorrowland

Tomorrowland is a sci-fi movie telling the story about the group of brilliant minds recruited by a mysterious pin summoning them to a strange futuristic place - Tomorrowland. A teen prodigy Casey and a former kid-genius Frank are together battling the odds and self-fulfilling prophecy which doomed the world to its end. Robson Square comes up at the end of the movie as Tokyo Square, where we are shown that more Tomorrowland pins are distributed through the world recruiting young talents from everywhere.

 

Meet The Photographer: Ricardo Vacas

Ricardo VacasRicardo Vacas

Ricardo Vacas, owner of the firm Kerp Photography, always showed intense interest in many forms of creative arts. His professional photography career started in his home country, Spain, where he was the official photographer of several music bands, models and clothing brands. He decided to move to Wellington, New Zealand in 2012, knowing his real interest was fashion photography more than any other field. Currently living in Vancouver, Canada, he now combines his fashion, editorial and commercial photography projects with regular trips to Europe and USA.

KVRVKV

 

Things You Need to Know Before Buying an Old House in Vancouver


A West End home - City of Vancouver Archives

Though a fairly young city, Vancouver has its share of older houses. In 2011, out of 41,440 owner-occupied single detached homes, thirty per cent of them were built in 1946 or earlier.

Older houses present problems for the prospective buyer. Insurers may refuse to cover, or renew policies on, houses that have not been upgraded to modern standards. What follows is a list of known issues that a buyer should investigate.

Is your wiring up to date?

Modern lifestyles, full of appliances and entertainment devices, consume far more electricity than they used to, and the electrical systems of older houses, built when the cutting edge of domestic technology was a two-slice toaster, may be inadequate to the task.

Many old houses have knob and tube wiring, also known as K&T wiring or open wiring. Every house in North America built between 1880 and 1940 had K&T wiring, and "It is still present to some degree in the vast majority of occupied houses in B.C. that were built pre-1950." The copper wire was covered by a cloth and rubber insulation called "loom", and ran through porcelain knobs and tubes. K&T is ungrounded and can short out. Electrical service was often limited to 60 amps.

K&T wiring was not designed to handle modern demands, and can post a risk for fire hazards. If a system built for 15 amps is overtaxed and constantly blowing fuses, homeowners may install 25 or 30 amp fuses, which may cause the wiring to overheat. This makes the wire and insulation brittle and contributes to the risk of fires. Another problem comes from retrofitting modern outlets to older wiring systems.

Some insurance companies will increase their fees for houses with K&T wiring, or not cover them at all. Furthermore, unprofessional electricians may not know the requirements of this kind of wiring, and repair it with scotch or masking tape instead of professional electrical tape.

Homes built between 1965 and 1976 may have aluminum wiring instead of modern copper wiring. Aluminum wiring is susceptible to overheating and failure of terminals, indicated by discolouring near the wall receptacle, the smell of hot plastic, or flickering lights. Most of these problems occurred with 110 volt circuits for outlets and lights, not the 220 volt circuits for major appliances.

According to an essay by a master electrician, out of the 500 Vancouver houses more than forty years old he surveyed, 95 per cent of them had electrical fire hazards, which he attributed to "handyman tinkering" by non-professionals.

When selling houses, particularly old ones, realtors are obligated to educate the buyers and sellers about the kind of wiring. It requires a certified electrician’s inspection, and that finding will inevitably recommend replacing the wiring. Removal and replacement of the wiring for a 1500 square foot house can cost from $5,000 to $8,000, and take one week or more. Upgrading an existing electrical panel to 200 amps can cost about $1,200.

Beware of the UFFI

UFFI is urea formaldehyde foam insulation, a shaving cream-like foam that can be injected into and around electrical outlets, plumbing and other hard-to-reach spaces. During the energy crisis of the early 1970s, hundreds of thousands of Canadian homes were insulated with UFFI to reduce heating costs. However, homeowners afterwards reported respiratory problems, eye irritation, fatigue, and other symptoms, which Health Canada attributed to formaldehyde gas released from the UFFI. The insulation was banned in Canada in 1980, and later in the USA.

Whether UFFI actually releases enough formaldehyde to be harmful is debated, particularly cases in which the insulation was installed 30 or more years ago. The Canadian Cancer Association’s website says, "Homes that had UFFI installed many years ago probably do not have high formaldehyde levels now." A post on the website of Carson Dunlop home inspection services concludes, "urea formaldehyde foam insulation has not been shown to be a health concern." Health Canada also points out that UFFI can deteriorate when wet, and release increased formaldehyde if installed incorrectly.

Regardless, currently UFFI is banned in Canada. The presence of UFFI in a house can lower its price greatly, and prevent mortgage companies from financing it.

Always check for asbestos

Perhaps the best known dangerous house material, asbestos is an insulating agent known to be cause cancer and respiratory disease, and cannot be detected just by looking at it. Homes built before 1990 are more likely to have asbestos, in floor tiles, wrapped around furnace ducts or pipes, or in other areas.

Health Canada recommends that people reduce risk of exposure by hiring professional inspectors before altering their house. Often, the best response to pre-existing asbestos is to leave it be. WorkSafeBC recommends that asbestos should be identified and removed by trained professionals with protective gear, and that homeowners should contact their municipality to learn how to safely dispose of asbestos materials.

Homeowners should note that asbestos in a home may fall under the asbestos exclusion clause of an insurance policy.

The Professional Standards Manual of the Real Estate Council of British Columbia requires that sellers discloses the presence of UFFI and asbestos in properties. A hazardous materials survey can cost from $500 to $2000 or more, and removal of asbestos, depending on the type of material, can run from $400 to $15,000. Removal of UFFI can cost about $10,000 for an attic and between $15,000 and $20,000 for an entire house.

Vintage furnace is not always a win

Beginning in the 1930s, gas- and oil-powered furnaces were a major improvement over older, coal powered furnaces that had to be stoked. However, oil furnaces can be an environmental hazard and a fire risk, causing higher insurance costs. Forced-air gas furnaces and electric heat are much lower risks, and are more efficient too. A new furnace and re-routed ducts can cost about $8,000.

Another common feature of older houses is oil tanks for furnaces, whether indoors or outdoors, aboveground or belowground. Leaks from oil tanks can releases hundreds of litres of oil into the home or the ground, contaminating the soil and groundwater, or getting into the sump pump or floor drain. Many oil tanks corrode from the inside out, making their weakness invisible. As water in the tank sinks to the bottom, it may cause rust or corrosion where the legs attach. The only sign may be the odor of oil.

The presence of an old oil tank may cause the denial of homeowners insurance. According to a report from the Canadian Real Estate Association, "A home with an exterior oil tank older than 15 years, or an interior tank older than 25 years, usually will not be insured." British Columbia has standards for residential oil tanks in place, but voluntary guidelines for the maintenance and repair of installed tanks.

A paper from the environmental law clinic of the University of Victoria says that "B.C.’s Environmental Management Act and the common law can require the owner of a property that is a contamination source to pay for the cost of cleaning up that contamination and contamination of neighbouring properties." Insurance policies may have pollution exclusion clauses that keep them from having to pay for such spills. Removal of an oil tank from a basement costs between $350 and $500.

An older or heritage home may also be denied insurance if it has a roof has not been updated in the past 20 years, a wood-heating system, galvanized pipe or lead plumbing, lead-based paint, or problems with the septic or well installations.

Despite the issues with older houses, it is still almost always possible to get insurance, especially for people who already had insurance and are renewing policies. First-time buyers may need to turn to a specialty provider with higher premiums. Such houses also may take longer to insure, and buyers should start looking for coverage as soon as possible. Installing smoke alarms, sprinkler systems or monitored burglar alarms can also be rewarded with discounts.


 

Photo Essay: Best Vancouver Ice Cream Shops

It's summer, which means great ice cream shops have been popping all over the place in Vancouver. Every year, there are new and awesome artisanal gelato shops opening all over the city. But good ice cream is something that takes years to master and once you do, your patrons will be coming back no matter what new and exciting gelateria opened across the street. Here's how it looked in our personal favorite ice cream shops this summer.

A scoop from Rain or Shine

Rain or Shine

Location: 3382 Cambie Street or 1926 West 4th Ave
Website: rainorshineicecream.com

Ice Cream is a treat most people associate with happiness, childhood memories and summer. Rain or Shine is a company which wants to make you remember these happy days and relive them again, be it a sunny day or a truly rainy one. They specialize in making ice cream fun, while keeping the ingredients, fresh, local and natural, without added chemicals or flavours. They even have a list of local suppliers for you to read through, including Birchwood Dairy, Vancouver Olive Oil Company, Canadian Hazelnut Company, Campbell’s Honey and many more seasonal suppliers providing the freshest ingredients for your ice cream.

For those who can't choose just one or two from their variety of flavours, or those who are looking to stock their fridge for worse days, they have ice cream flights and whole pints on the menu.


Rain or Shine is a place that doesn't just sell the ice cream. They provide a place for people to enjoy each others company. This place became a true social hub for the neighbourhood. People from all over the place are coming in for a scoop. A big part of the charm is the friendly and always smiling staff working at the shop.

Rain or Shine is open every day from noon to 10 pm.

Earnest Ice Cream

Location: 3992 Fraser St or 1829 Quebec Street
Website: earnesticecream.com

What would make ice cream even better? Enjoying ice cream that comes from honest local sources in a place that cares for the environment. That's Earnest Ice Cream for you, a true environmentally-friendly ice cream shop in town, trying to become a first zero-waste ice cream shop in Vancouver.

They create their ice cream in small batches with the freshest of ingredients for you to enjoy in the shop or take home with you. They have a good selection of classic flavours like caramel, chocolate, and vanilla, but they also rotate a selection of seasonal flavours you really need to get before they are gone. With Flavours like Bourbon Peach or Blackberry Cheesecake, you can't go wrong. They even make innovative vegan options. At their shop, you can enjoy Vegan Chai, Vegan Strawberry Brownie or a vegan classic like Vegan Cookies and Cream.

They will also happily pack some ice cream for you to take home and make you feel good about caring for the environment. Their ice cream pints are packed into returnable and reusable jars that make them a true zero waste company. You can even find these pints all over the city, in your favourite coffee shops or restaurants. And every jar you bring back gives you a $1 store credit to use for your favourite ice cream flavour. Pleasure doing business with them, isn't it?

Both of their locations are open for you to enjoy Monday to Sunday from 12 pm to 10 pm. If you are not in the area, you can check all their pints distributor on their site.

La Casa Gelato

Location: 1033 Venables Street
Website: lacasagelato.com

When it comes to gelaterias, La Casa Gelato is the mother ship. Since 1994 these guys have been producing some of the finest gelato in town from their tucked away location in Strathcona. Now with more than 588 flavours (and counting), no one comes close to the variety and creativity of this elite creamery.

Forget about chocolate and vanilla. We're talking jalapeno blackberry gelato that is almost too hot to handle. We're talking aged balsamic vinegar gelato that tastes like balsamic vinegar. With 218 flavours available on site at all times, it would take hours just to sample all the options. Whether you're looking for something classic or for something completely off the wall, this place has got it. There's even apple wasabi gelato.

Usually packed with people and with dance-pop spreading around from the speakers, this is truly a unique ice cream experience and is worth visiting at any time of year. Funny moments, like the crowd taking a break from sampling the sweets to spontaneously dancing the Macarena is what happens here a lot.

Upon walking in the door, you buy a poker chip representing your desired serving size. You are then free to roam the store, sampling as many of the flavours as you like. When you find the one for you (or, if you're feeling lucky), you trade in your chip and get your scoop. When it comes down to it, making the final decision is nearly impossible. Thankfully, there isn't anything here which isn't worth having — even if only for the novelty of eating ice cream that tastes exactly like garlic. Yes, they have garlic flavoured gelato, and yes, you should try it.

You can test your taste buds and try all the flavours in La Casa Gelato 7 days a week, 365 days a year 11 am till 11 pm. Twelve hours should be enough to taste at least half of their flavours!

Meet The Photographer: Ricardo Vacas

Ricardo VacasRicardo Vacas

Ricardo Vacas, owner of the firm Kerp Photography, always showed intense interest in many forms of creative arts. His professional photography career started in his home country, Spain, where he was the official photographer of several music bands, models and clothing brands. He decided to move to Wellington, New Zealand in 2012, knowing his real interest was fashion photography more than any other field. Currently living in Vancouver, Canada, he now combines his fashion, editorial and commercial photography projects with regular trips to Europe and USA.

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The Vancouver Resident’s Guide to Alternative Gardening

Cherry Tomatoes by Jonas Ingold

With short winters, plenty of fertile soil, and a temperate rainforest climate, Vancouver is the perfect place to grow a lush, beautiful garden. The only problem is that many Vancouver residents don’t have an actual garden space to plant in. This doesn’t mean that gardening isn’t an option in Vancouver, though. Lacking their own garden plot, many Vancouver renters and homeowners have turned to alternative methods for keeping a garden. From community gardens to boulevard plots, here are some of the most popular options in the city for space-challenged gardeners.

Rooftop and Patio Gardens

Because much of Vancouver’s urban space is taken up by highrises, many developers are looking upwards to create gardening options. Rooftop and patio gardens are becoming increasingly common in Vancouver, especially in new condo and apartment buildings. Much of this is thanks to the City’s active promotion of urban gardening spaces within new developments.

Vancouver Rooftop Garden by Kyle Pearce

"We encourage developers to put shared garden plots on their roof or their podium," says James O’Neill, food policy planner for the City of Vancouver. Of course, not all buildings will be well-suited for garden plots, so City staff have to balance the desire for shared gardens along with other needs such as recreation areas and playground spaces.

"There are so many other competing interests that need to be balanced," O’Neill says. Even with all of these competing interest in mind, however, O’Neill notes that adding a shared garden space to a residential development proposal often makes the proposal more appealing for the City.

Small Space Gardens

If you live in a condo or apartment building without a rooftop or patio garden, you may still be able to use the space you already have to satisfy your gardening itch. Even with a small patio, there can be plenty of growing potential – as long as you’re facing the right direction.

According to Michael Levenston, executive director of City Farmer Society, a non-profit group that encourages urban farming in Vancouver, the challenge is first of all finding the space and then finding the sunlight:

If you have a balcony you can grow on the balcony but you want to be facing the sun.

Growing Vegetables on the Deck by Ruth Hartnup

As long as you have adequate sunlight, Levenston says, the space requirements for a balcony or backyard garden are minimal.

You can start with a square foot and grow something in a square foot, and then you can expand that to whatever size you want.

Many people will build their own raised beds for planting out of a few pieces of wood, although if you prefer a professionally-made product, Levenston adds that there are companies that can make raised beds for you to match your exact specifications.

Community Gardens

For those seeking garden space outside of their own property, community gardens are a common solution. However, community gardening has become so popular in Vancouver that finding space can be a real challenge. According to O'Neill:

There are so many people who want to garden in the city and many of our community gardens have several year wait lists.

Davie Village Community Garden by Daryl Mitchell

According to City Hall, there are over 110 community gardens within the City of Vancouver which can be found on city-owned land, at churches, at schools, and on private property. Even this number of gardens, however, is not enough to satisfy the city’s growing population.

But just because a community garden is full, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t get your name on the list. Levenston explains that spaces can open up when someone moves away or stops using their garden plot, or when a new community garden opens up.

There’s usually a lineup but that’s not to say you shouldn’t put your name in.

Garden Sharing

While not everyone who wants to plant a garden will have access to one, not everyone who has a garden will be interested in planting it either. That’s why many Vancouverites have turned to a shared space model to meet their gardening needs.

In past years, people who wanted to share gardens in Vancouver could do so through an online forum, but the website is no longer functioning due to lack of funding, Levenston says. These days, garden sharing in Vancouver often occurs through informal networks, although Levenston adds that City Farmer often acts as an intermediary for these sorts of arrangements as well.

I get calls from people who say I’ve got this patch of land, can you find someone?

In addition, residents can look to international websites such as yardsharing.org or even Craigslist in order to connect with others who might want to share a garden space.

Vancouver Greens by Ruth Hartnup

Boulevard and Street Gardens

Another option the City has been actively promoting for gardeners is the option to plant on City land in places like boulevards and traffic circles. As O’Neill explains, any resident who has a boulevard in front of their property is encouraged to use that space for growing both edible and ornamental plants.

The boulevard is defined as the place between the curb and the sidewalk. For those who don’t have access to a boulevard, another option could be to become a volunteer with the Green Streets program, which allows volunteers to plant gardens in traffic calming areas such as traffic circles and bulges.

Initially, both the Green Streets and boulevard gardening programs only allowed for decorative gardens, but both programs have now expanded to allow for food growing as well, as long as gardeners follow the guidelines set out by the city. These guidelines include making sure plants don’t reach more than one metre in height in order to preserve sightlines for drivers and pedestrians, and taking precautions to minimize the effects of airborne toxins such as vehicle emissions.

City Beet Urban Farm in Mount Pleasant by Ruth Hartnup

Greening the Greenest City

Year after year, Vancouver has been recognized by surveys such as the Siemens Green City Index as one of the most environmentally-friendly cities not only in Canada, but around the world. In 2016, Vancouver was ranked second overall in North America on the Green Cities Index, and ranked first based on air quality and CO2 levels. And despite the city’s continuously increasing density and growing population, creating green spaces has remained a priority. O'Neill confirms this:

We try to encourage as much food growing and gardening in the city as possible. We’re trying to remove barriers as much as we can to allow it to happen through developments, through multi-family buildings, in high density areas, and also in single-family home areas.

For residents, these varied options for gardening and food growing mean that everyone can have their own role in making the city a more beautiful and eco-friendly place, even if they don’t have a garden space of their own.

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Vancouver Neighbourhood Photo Essays: West Point Grey

West Point Grey is bordered by 16th Avenue to the south, Alma Street to the east, English Bay to the north, and Blanca Street to the west.

According to the City of Vancouver, the Musqueam people lived in this area’s ancient village. A First Nations legend refers to Point Grey as the “Battleground of the West Wind.” The neighbourhood is named after Captain George Grey, a friend of Captain George Vancouver and it was its own municipality from 1908 until 1929, when it was merged with Vancouver.

This compact neighbourhood attracts with its quiet residential streets bordered by trees and the proximity to Vancouver downtown and the beach. The main commercial area is along West 10th Avenue between Tolmie Street and Discovery Street, offering a popular shopping and restaurant district where old shops sit by new residential blocks.

While it’s one of the city’s most exclusive neighbourhoods, West Point Grey is home to a mixture of residents including working professionals, business owners, faculty members of the University of British Columbia, artists, university students or young families. One of the segments of the neighbourhood’s population are longtime middle class homeowners who moved to the neighbourhood before it became one of Canada’s most expensive residential areas.

10th Avenue

Access and Transit

The access and transit are very simple thanks to the location and character of the neighbourhood. West 16th is a key route terminating at UBC, while West 10th, the commercial heart of the neighbourhood offers many bus lines, too. Alma Street hosts bus routes to the Southlands and Dunbar as well as north to downtown and Kitsilano. Another popular choice of commuters is the Off-Broadway cycling route.

Nature and Recreation

West Point Grey is the place where the view of Vancouver and the North Shore Mountains can be admired the most thanks to the exquisite views created by the natural terracing. There are many spaces for recreation, whether it comes to parks, beaches or forests. The popular beaches of Spanish Banks, Jericho and Locarno have trails across forests and along beaches which are great for a refreshing walk or birdwatching. There are also several dog friendly areas where you can appreciate the natural terrain and play with your dog off-leash. 

Trails lead through Pacific Spirit where the numerous walking, running, hiking, biking, and horseback riding paths offer an escape from the streets and busier seaside. Jericho Park is the easternmost of the beaches, a home to a forest and a waterfront that are home to beavers, turtles or blackbirds. Jericho Sailing Centre offers kayaking lessons.

Spanish Banks
Jericho Beach Park
Jericho Sailing Centre

Events

The main event of the neighbourhood’s social calendar is Fiesta Days, a community festival that combines a carnival and stage performances. This family oriented event is held in June along the West 10th Avenue between Tolmie Street and Discovery Street. In addition, July brings the annual Vancouver Folk Music Festival taking place at Jericho Park.

Where to Drink and Eat

With impressive lunch options and a variety of coffee beans available for purchase, Bean Around The World is an excellent spot for coffee lovers. If you would like to visit the 'home to the world's best cinnamon bun', stop by at Grounds for Coffee and try their organic Arabica coffee. The Diner offers authentic British meals (and humour) while Burgoo Bistro has comfort food at its best from around the world. 

Jericho Pier
Jericho Pier
10th Avenue
10th Avenue
Hasting Mill Store Museum
4th Avenue
Jericho Beach
Panne Rizo (10th Avenue)
Spanish Banks

Meet The Photographer: Ricardo Vacas

Ricardo VacasRicardo Vacas

Ricardo Vacas, owner of the firm Kerp Photography, always showed intense interest in many forms of creative arts. His professional photography career started in his home country, Spain, where he was the official photographer of several music bands, models and clothing brands. He decided to move to Wellington, New Zealand in 2012, knowing his real interest was fashion photography more than any other field. Currently living in Vancouver, Canada, he now combines his fashion, editorial and commercial photography projects with regular trips to Europe and USA.

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Parking in Vancouver: Parking Spots, By-laws

ICBC says there were 1,376,000 passenger vehicle policies in the Lower Mainland in 2015. All of those cars and other vehicles need to be parked somewhere. A rule of thumb for land-use planning says that every car has one space at home and three or four other spaces waiting for it elsewhere. Yet there is only so much parking space available in Vancouver. There are a few tips on how to find free convenient parking in Vancouver, but drivers will probably have to use paid parking at some point.

parking-in-vancouver-3

Drivers need to be aware of the City’s rules and regulations when it comes to parking on city streets to avoid fines and upset neighbours. There are different rules depending on whether there are signs on the street or if you are at a meter. Many residents are unaware of the three-hour bylaw that states you cannot remain parked for more than three hours in front of a property you don’t own or live at. It is in effect between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. daily.

Another regulation to pay attention to concerns parking near a fire hydrant; there must be at least five meters between the hydrant and the car.

Drivers are also not allowed to idle a vehicle for more than three consecutive minutes per hour or while there is no one in the vehicle and it is unlocked. Parking is also forbidden within 6 meters of the nearest edge of a sidewalk of an intersecting street, within 1.5 meters of an intersecting lane, private road, boulevard crossing, sidewalk crossing, or driveway, or within 5.5 m directly in front of private driveways, roads, and garage entrances. There are several other regulations about parking on the City website.

Tickets

Parking tickets may be paid at a 40 per cent discount within fourteen days. After thirty-five days, a fine is added to the ticket, and after sixty days the ticket goes to a collection agency, which may affect your credit rating. You can buy the tickets online or by phone with Visa, American Express or MasterCard, or by cheque or money order in person or by mail. 

Time limited parking

Some parking spaces are time-limited, typically one or two hours, depending on demand. Time-limit parking spaces are indicated by street signs, which show the times and days when the restrictions apply.

Parking Meters

Other spaces have parking meters. The rates can vary depending on the location and time of day and you can pay with coins, a credit card, or a mobile app. All of the City’s parking meters run from 9 a.m. until 10 p.m. every day (including holidays).

Parking Apps

Drivers can use two major smart phone apps to help find and manage parking on Vancouver streets. The first app is Easy Park app, by a City-owned, not-for-profit parking company. Drivers can find lot locations, entrance locations and rates. You can also pay from your phone and extend your parking time when you are away from your vehicle. Find it on the Google Play and App Store.

The second app is Pay by Phone. It can be linked to your credit card and uses your license plate number to register your car for parking. It can be used at meters around Vancouver and also some lots. The app will send you a text message when the time is nearly done. Users can extend the time from the app. Pay by Phone is available for Apple, Android and Blackberry phones.

Accessible Parking

For travellers with disabilities, there are designated disabled parking zones and accessible parking meter spots throughout Vancouver. The City maintains a GoogleMap of accessible parking spaces, which can be used by vehicles with valid permits from the Social Planning And Research Council of BC (SPARC BC). You can apply for a SPARC permit at their website.

Other Alternatives

Other alternatives to cut down on parking problems include car-sharing, carpooling, and ride-sharing. There are several car-sharing cooperatives and businesses available in Vancouver, including Car2Go, Evo, Modo and Zipcar. Carpooling and ride-sharing can be done with friends and co-workers, or organized via services like the JackBell ride-share database.

parking-in-vancouver-6

Transit Options

There are alternate ways of getting around the city that don’t require parking. The City estimates about 50 per cent of trips are done by walking, cycling or using public transit. TransLink, the body in charge of the region’s public transportation, claims that 85 per cent of Metro Vancouver residents live less than 400 metres from a bus stop, which connects to the over 210 bus routes running around the city. Vancouver’s public transportation options include the Skytrain, which has the Expo Line running north-west to south-east and the Millennium Line that runs in a loop east to west. There is also the Seabus, which connects Waterfront Station downtown to Lonsdale Quay in North Vancouver, and HandyDART, a door-to-door service for people with disabilities.

Residential Parking

Some residential areas have restricted parking, which combines restricted parking for residents with time-limited and unregulated spaces for visitors. Residents with valid car insurance can buy annual parking permits online, by phone, or in person during business hours. You will receive a decal by mail, which you apply to your vehicle. This only applies if the decal matches the vehicle and the license plate of your vehicle. Depending on the area, the annual fee ranges from $38.93 to $77.90. Also, some areas allow a maximum of two permits per household.

The City also provides short-term and visitor parking permits, useful for guests, rental vehicles, and borrowed cars. You or your guest must apply in person at City Hall. (For the West End or Robson North zones only, apply at the West End Community Centre, 870 Denman Street.) Contractor permits cost $5.25 per day, while all other permits cost $10.50 per week.

Designers and architects should refer to the City’s parking bylaws, policies and guidelines.

parking-in-vancouver-4

Referendum Rejected

With an average of 870,000 vehicles on Metro Vancouver roads daily and just 10,000-metered parking spots plus about 17,550 at Easy Park lots the city faces a challenge.

Add to that the expectation that there will be 170,000 new residents by 2045 the City needs to advance a plan to ease the congestion. Because there is a shortage of land in Vancouver it is easier to make the transit system more efficient and more attractive rather than try and increase the available parking spots. This is the problem the Mayors Council Plan hopes to help by promising to reduce the traffic problem by 20 per cent.

The plan largely focuses on improving the region’s public transportation system including an expansion to the Millennium Line along Broadway from Commercial Drive and UBC. It will also add five new b-lines to the roughly 210 bus routes it already has. The new routes have been defined as:

  • Downtown to SFU via Hastings Street;
  • Downtown to SE Marine Drive via Victoria Drive and Commercial Drive;
  • Downtown to Lynn Valley Centre in N Vancouver by West Georgia Street;
  • Joyce-Collingwood Station to UBC along 41st Ave;
  • Southeast Vancouver to Richmond and Burnaby via Knight Street.

The plan also commits to increasing sea bus service by 50 per cent.

However, residents essentially voted against funding the plan by rejecting a tax that would have covered the cost of the project in a 2015 referendum. Elections BC website records a total of 61.68 per cent of voters against the tax while 38.32 per cent supported it. Reports state the tax would have been a 0.5 per cent sales tax and revenue was expected to cover the $7.5 billion of in projects. It would have helped pay for some of the 10-year plan, which included an east-west subway line, a light rail system for Surrey that would reach to Langley and 11 new rapid bus lines in the suburbs, as well as a third harbour ferry.

Matt Taylor, a Master’s of Engineering Student at UBC has outlined the transportation problem in Vancouver in a YouTube video. He estimates there will be about 1,100,000 new residents in Vancouver. Which will mean an addition of 730,000 vehicles "at current ownership rates."

Taylor said that with that amount of growth the city would need an addition 2,200,000 more parking spaces. Due to the lack of land in the city, most of the spots would need to be built underground. At a cost of $40,000 per spot, Taylor said that would be a total cost of $90,000,000.

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Vancouver Film Locations: Vancouver Marine Building

Marine Building is an art-deco styled skyscraper located at 355 Burrard Street in Downtown Vancouver. Designed by architects of McCarter Nairne, it opened its gates in October 1930 as a dominant of our city. At 321 ft with 22 floors, Marine Building remained the tallest building in Vancouver for nine years, until it was bested by Hotel Vancouver in 1939.

marine-building

Marine Building has its name for the extensive decor depicting marine flora and fauna. The architects themselves tried to design the building as a giant crag rising from the sea. Think iceberg from Titanic, but fewer people and more sea-snails, turtles, scallops and sea horses. For its majestic beauty and extensive decor, it's a popular spot to use as a background in movies and TV shows. Marine Building was almost everything in it's time, from banks and office buildings, to police bureaus and superhero headquarters. Let's take a look how and which movie crews changed this memorable building in the recent years:

Backstrom

Backstrom is a detective comedy-drama set in Portland, Oregon, so of course their main filming location would be Vancouver, because why not. Main character Detective Lieutenant Everett Backstrom, played by Rainn Wilson, who you probably know better as Dwight from the US version of The Office, is an anti-hero on the right side of the law. A bit politically incorrect, rude, and struggling with alcoholism, he is a mix of everything that makes a prototype of a bad cop. Yet, he takes on cases with special interest, that nobody else can solve. And yes, he solves them. Think of him as the very modern, more unpleasant form of Sherlock Holmes.


Marine Building in this TV series represents Portland Police Bureau. Backstrom is seen walking out of the building and lighting a cigar on his way, while rain is pouring down. As spectators say, it was one of the sunniest Easter weekends when Backstrom was filming one of it's most melancholic scenes and the film crew set up a giant rain tower to create the right atmosphere, despite the fact that if they would film any other day, Vancouver would provide the right conditions on its own.

Caprica

Caprica is a victim of yet another 'try to cash on a spin-off that never could work' scheme. Written as a prequel for the geek-beloved Battlestar Galactica (the reboot, not the original, mind you), Caprica is taking place 58 years before the destruction of twelve colonies.


This series maps how humans created the robots Cylons that later turned against their masters in the original Galactica reboot. Do you also have the feeling that this is getting too confusing with the original, reboot original and the prequel? Please, no more sequels, we beg you Syfy.


As is tradition with prequels, the show had low ratings and was pulled from the air on Syfy even before they finished airing the first season and these episodes were later included on DVD. Before that, they aired the episode 5, where the Marine Building is shown as the New Cap City Bank where a heist is in the process. Vancouver substituted nuked Caprica City before in rebooted Battlestar Galactica, heavily altered with CGI to fit the story. However, in Caprica itself, only small additions were made to fit the futuristic look the series was going for.

Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency

There's not much to tell about Dirk Gently and its plot without leaving you even more confused with what exactly is going on in this series. Dirk Gently is a holistic detective. Yes, you read that right. Holistic as in he does everything, from your run-of-the-mill lost corgi to supernatural cases of great importance. Because, naturally, everything in the universe is connected.

Confused yet?


It seems as no surprise that this BBC America and Netflix collaboration series is based on the books of Douglas Adams, who you might know as the author of Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. The show takes place after the first two books and should be an homage to the non-existent third book that Adams planned to write before he died. The first season was filmed almost entirely in Vancouver. Marine Building was used here as a lobby of Perryman Grand Hotel, where Dirk's sidekick-against-his-will Todd works. Or you know, worked, before he got fired in this very scene.

Smallville

Where else would you put a famous news agency, if not the Marine Building? In Smallville, a teen-inspired prequel to Superman movies, The Daily Planet, news agency where Superman - excuse me I mean Clark Kent - ends up working, is pictured as the Vancouver Marine Building.


The most entertaining thing about all of this is that the original building, as it appeared in the comics, was based on the Old Toronto Star Building where the co-creator of Superman Joe Shuster was a newsboy.


He even claimed that fictional city Metropolis, where Superman does most of his saving and hero-related stuff, was based on Toronto. However, this view shifted since then and Metropolis, as we know it now, reminds people New York City more than Toronto.

Fairly Legal

Nothing says I despise the law more than becoming a mediator. Kate Reed (played by Sarah Shahi, who you might remember as Sam from Person of Interest), was a great lawyer at her father's firm. But then she realised she wanted something more, she wanted to help people. And that's where the series starts, with Kate determined to do good by occasional acting a bit against the law.


As it goes in the series about lawyers, nothing says successful as a fancy office building. This USA Network comedy is no exception. In the 7th episode of the first season, the Marine Building served as an entrance to one of the buildings where one of the lawyer's Kate is confronting, has an office.

Fantastic Four

In Fantastic Four, and we mean the more classical 2005 and 2007 movies, not the train-wreck that was 2015 version, the Marine Building is the centre of the attention of fictional New York City. This building represents the Baxter Building, a fictional residence in Manhattan that houses the Fantastic Four headquarters.


In contrast with the comics, where Baxter Building is shown as strictly military and industrial looking, for the movie creators choose the art-deco inspired Marine Building as a bit more indulgent original living quarters of Reed Richards. In the latest comics, the creators even shifted their view and draw the Baxter Building with a bit of flourish, reminding more Vancouver Marine Building, than the original military structure.

Life or Something Like It

Angelina Jolie stars as Lanie Kerrigan in this romantic comedy-drama about a reporter living the perfect life. Or so she thinks until a homeless psychic tells her she is gonna die next Tuesday. From there, things start spinning out of control, as Lanie tries to change the course of her destiny and finding some meaning in her life.


And what movie set in New York City would it be without filming the prettiest buildings in Vancouver. The Marine Building was used as a set for A.M. USA offices, where Lanie longs to work as a big-star reporter. Because every news agency needs its old, art-deco building, right?

Lucifer

If you always wanted to see a supernatural police comedy with an unusual main character, who is good despite being bad, you are in luck because Fox recently introduced Lucifer to its viewers and changed the way you will look at procedural police series. The story is about the proverbial Satan struggling with his "work" (read damning souls for eternity) and going for a holiday to Los Angeles. Do you see the irony in this? Of course, he runs into a very attractive detective, who is somehow immune to his charm and sets to help her solve crimes.


In eight episode of the first season, Detective Chloe Decker and Lucifer come across potential murder suspect Richard Kester, who is standing at the edge of the building, ready to jump. Naturally, this building is the Marine Building in Vancouver, because no other building has such a beautiful rim you can stand on. In this scene, Lucifer manages to talk Richard out of jumping by accident, so it ends well for both Richard and the steps of the building that don't have to be drenched in fake blood. Talk about a step off of the devil path, oops.

The Flash

If you had the power to travel trough mirrors, why not rob a bank in an art-deco building? The same train of thoughts was probably what the Mirror Master from CW's The Flash had. In the third season, he decides to rob Central's City First National Bank, set in the Vancouver Marine Building. He almost succeeded, which is not that surprising, since that building has a very suspicious amount of mirrors for a bank. He is stopped by The Flash and Jesse Quick. Nobody is surprised.

 

Meet The Photographer: Ricardo Vacas

Ricardo VacasRicardo Vacas

Ricardo Vacas, owner of the firm Kerp Photography, always showed intense interest in many forms of creative arts. His professional photography career started in his home country, Spain, where he was the official photographer of several music bands, models and clothing brands. He decided to move to Wellington, New Zealand in 2012, knowing his real interest was fashion photography more than any other field. Currently living in Vancouver, Canada, he now combines his fashion, editorial and commercial photography projects with regular trips to Europe and USA.

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The (Inevitable) Future of Housing in Vancouver

As the city with the highest density rate in Canada, Vancouver architects and city planners need to find new ways to increase housing density to make way for the population growth, which is expected to reach 3.1 million over the next 14 years. Local architect Michael Geller has looked to Europe for inspiration.

Downtown Vancouver by The West EndDowntown Vancouver by The West End
Geller recently wrote about some European concepts for urban homes that he believes would fit in well with the Vancouver scene."Throughout Europe whenever they build townhouses or row houses they are not part of a condominium. They are individually owned just like a single family house is," Geller told Vancouver Homes. One of the attractions of this, he explained, was the freedom to make the house your own.

If you want to paint your door a different colour or plant vegetables in the garden you don’t need the approval of a strata council.

STACKED TOWNHOUSES

There was another innovation of European-style housing that Geller said would work for Vancouver: stacked townhouses.

The idea is that you may have a row house above another row house but each has a front door at the street. So, you can create housing with prices comparable to an apartment but you don’t have to go through a lobby and corridor and elevator to get to your home.

According to Geller these are not only high density buildings but also an attractive option for residents.

Certainly that is something that would be very attractive to a lot of people who can’t afford a row house and really don’t want to live in an apartment building.

He said stacked townhouse style homes were very popular in Toronto and Montreal, who have a higher population than Vancouver.

There are a couple of examples in Vancouver but normally the zoning prohibits them.

They are not unusual to Vancouver, in fact, the Katz company developed the first stacked townhouses in the province on 8th and Cyprus in the 70s. As part of their design the units have a garden and the upper units have a roof garden. There is a communal courtyard and playground incorporated in the design.

However, the assistant director for Urban Design with the City of Vancouver said there may be more of these types of buildings coming on to the market. "You are starting to see them getting built now," Anita Molaro said. "There are more and more applications that are coming on stream."

Some of these projects include Norquay Village and Little Mountain There are also stacked townhomes located in Mount Pleasant. The 16East development was done by StudioOne Architecture. The units are 2-3 bedrooms and include hardwood flooring, rooftop patios and underground parking.

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HEIGHT DOES NOT EQUAL DENSITY

Geller said a unique aspect of stacked town houses in Europe was that they were narrow and could be up to four storeys.

When you are starting to get into four storey townhouses, you are getting a density that is comparable to a much higher building,

Geller explained, adding there were some examples in Vancouver.

"Those buildings along Commercial Drive or Fourth Avenue or Broadway they have what we call a floor space ratio or FSR, which is the ratio of the size of the building to the size of the land, of around 2.5. The 12-storey high rise buildings in Kerrisdale or South Granville are less than that." 

"People invariably associate high density with high rise. It is just not necessarily the case." Geller said that in Toronto often the stacked townhouses were situated back to back in an effort to further increase density. In other words, they only have windows on one side, like an apartment would, but you can get very high densities with this type of housing.

According to Geller the urban dwellers would be attracted to these sorts of buildings because they offer freedom that apartment living doesn’t, as well as some special features. "A lot of the stacked townhouses or row houses will have a roof terrace," he said. "A backyard might be better but if you can’t afford a place with a backyard there is another option especially in the city."

UNIQUE BUILDING DESIGNS

In the quest to make affordable, high density homes attractive to urban dwellers in Vancouver, Bjarke Ingels, an architect from Denmark, has created a unique residential building, the Beach and Howe Tower near Granville Bridge. The building, which was reported about by CNBC, will stand 151 meters and provide a view of the beach and mountains to attract residents. Its unique, twisted shape was designed to avoid unsightly views of the nearby highway.

The building has brought to the Vancouver housing market an extra 600 units, including 180 that are market value. There is also a plan to create an outdoor art gallery on the underside of the Granville Bridge, which will give a modern feel to the neighbourhood.

Vancouver House by BIGBeach and Howe Tower by BIG

BIGGER NOT ALWAYS BETTER

Geller said another concern he had was the size of homes being built in the region: "Most new houses in metro Vancouver tend to be 2,250 square feet or more." 

When I was growing up we all lived in houses of less than 1,000 square feet. I think there is a need and demand for small houses of under 1,000 square feet both for empty nesters who want to downsize but also young households who really want a house and are just getting started.

Molaro said the City did not have a say in the size of housing that developers build: "Our zoning in our single family neighbourhoods allows for the majority of the city a floor area of 0.6 times the site area."

That is what the zoning will allow and that is what the zoning has been in place for, I would say, at least 30 or 40 years.

"It is true there is a lot of construction going on in the single family neighbourhoods and they are optimizing their full density potential," she said. However, Molaro also said that a lot of older homes have been built smaller but it was at the discretion of the builder.

What people chose to build on that property is their choice up to that limit.

She said that although the homes were large, most often there was a basement suite being developed on the land as well, all within the square footage.

Vancouver Canada by Nick KenrickVancouver Canada by Nick Kenrick

URBAN CHANGE NOT JUST FOR VANCOUVER

According to the report by CNBC, the World Health Organization has predicted the world’s urban population will be 6.4 billion by 2050. Thus, city planners around the world need to take into consideration how to obtain higher density spaces in attractive buildings, and how to make them affordable.

It has created a demand in cities around the world, including London, for thousands of new homes. In fact, the London Councils has said there is a need for 809,000 new homes in the next four years. In New York, Mayor Bill de Blasio has made a commitment to provide 200,000 affordable houses over the next three years. Molaro said that Vancouver was going to be a part of that change.

Ground-orientated type residential units and stacked townhouses are part of that sort of portfolio of typologies under consideration.

 

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Photo Essay: Catfe

Bringing together cats and coffee, Vancouver's first cat café quickly became a popular spot for the city's cat lovers. The concept of the themed café where visitors can watch and play with cats and take one home have spread throughout the world after the world’s first cat café opened in Taipei, Taiwan in 1998.

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Vancouver’s version opened in December 2016 at International Village and is a home to eight to twelve adoptable rescue cats at a time. The capacity of this place is limited so no wonder that Catfe has been very successful - almost too successful - getting cats adopted when it almost run out of kitties shortly after its opening. Catfe staff member Leah explained the idea behind this unique place:

It’s not just a café with cats. Cats can be used as therapy too and people can connect with animals. It’s difficult to find a place that allows cats In Vancouver so some people come here to get that contact. Cats are also relaxed here and I love seeing them changing. When they come here, they are sometimes frightened so you see how they change from nervous to happy after a while.

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Catfe offers drinks, snacks and coffee from local roasters. The light lunch menu includes Tartine quiches, vegetarian soups, savoury pastries and cat-themed treats as well as vegan and gluten-free options.

The café is open daily from 11 am to 9 pm except for Thursdays when the new cats are welcomed and the adopted ones picked-up. The public demand is exceeding the capacity of the café, so in order to maintain a healthy cat-to-human ratio, the number of visitors is limited to 16 people at the time. Admission is $5 per person with any cafe purchase (or $8 with no purchase) for a one-hour visit.

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Meet The Photographer: Ricardo Vacas

Ricardo VacasRicardo Vacas

Ricardo Vacas, owner of the firm Kerp Photography, always showed intense interest in many forms of creative arts. His professional photography career started in his home country, Spain, where he was the official photographer of several music bands, models and clothing brands. He decided to move to Wellington, New Zealand in 2012, knowing his real interest was fashion photography more than any other field. Currently living in Vancouver, Canada, he now combines his fashion, editorial and commercial photography projects with regular trips to Europe and USA.

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Vancouver Restaurants With the Longest Tradition: Minerva’s

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A fixture in Kerrisdale since 1973, Minerva's has provided Mediterranean food to the neighbourhood’s people for more than a generation.

Minerva's’ owner, Nonda Pavlakis, was a young man of 17 when he came to Vancouver from Greece in 1967 to be with his brother and sister. He did tailoring and sales at a clothing store, and later became part owner of the Copacabana night club.

I was at Copacabana and we had just sold the club. A friend of mine came along and he asked if I wanted to buy a restaurant. My answer to him was, ‘What the hell would we do with a restaurant? I don’t know anything about restaurants.’ A month later, I was involved in the restaurant. I just saw the opportunity was here. It was a little restaurant that was doing okay then.

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In 1975, he and his friend purchased a small, two-year-old pizza joint on West 41st from a Greek couple. The name Minerva's, from the Roman goddess of wisdom, came with the restaurant, even though the previous owners were Greek.

I took it over, with a friend of mine, actually, but he stayed here for about eight months and he left. I took over the restaurant and worked hard. About a couple of years later, we expanded.

At the time, Kerrisdale was, as Nonda puts it, "a nice little village. It has changed a lot now. It used to be all kinds of stores. Now you see coffee shops, beauty salons, and banks. That’s all you see in Kerrisdale."

As Kerrisdale evolved, Minerva's evolved along with it, going through renovations and expansions roughly every decade.

When we bought it, it was the old style with the red carpet, red chairs, velour wallpaper. We changed it over the years. Every few years we like to do something to update.

Currently, Minerva's has an understated style of comforting earth tones and diffused lighting, with paintings of Mediterranean scenes on the walls. In the summer, the large windows open onto the sidewalk.

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For our business, the changes were good, actually. Ninety per cent of our customers are repeat customers. They live in the neighbourhood, but the neighbourhood has changed a lot. It used to be older people here, but now there are a lot of young families moving into the area.

His wife Kay works behind the restaurant’s bar, and his son John runs the business as a manager, since 2007. In August of 2016, it opened up an adjoining bar on the corner, Barra 41, which John runs.

Over the years, we’ve changed the menu a lot. Because it was just a pizza and pasta place. Then we kept changing the menu every so often. We take something out, we add something. We go with the times. We go with the people’s needs. Now it’s mostly a Mediterranean restaurant. We still have the pizza, of course, but we’re very well known for our steaks and our barbecue. And of course, we have lots of Greek dishes, as well.

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Asked about the secret of his establishment’s longevity, Nonda is characteristically modest.

You have to take care of your customers. Give them the right things, give them the quality of the food. We have very good quality of food, and our prices are affordable. Our steaks, for example. We use the best steaks here. Downtown you would pay sixty dollars. Here you will pay thirty or thirty-five dollars.

Nonda talks about how former BC Premier Bill Vander Zalm and former Prime Minister Kim Campbell have visited and stops himself before he can name a certain Vancouver-born movie star who regularly eats there.

This is characteristic of how Nonda treats all of his customers, some of whom are neighbourhood regulars who eat there seven days a week.

I can walk around here right now, and I know every one of my customers. When you come in through that door, we try to make you be happy when you go. That’s the success of a restaurant. You don’t see the people as a dollar sign. You go to some places and they try to grab the dollar and they don’t care about the mood. Here, we like to see you over and over and again and again.

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After running a restaurant for more than forty years, Nonda says right now, he doesn't have any plans for the future.

I’m still working. I’m going to continue working.

The sample dinner was barbecued baby back ribs with spaghetti. The generously sized portion of ribs were tender and easily separated from the bones, which provided the requisite tactile experience. The barbecue sauce was tart and tasty. The accompanying spaghetti came with a red sauce with more subtle flavours than you would find in other restaurants. The side dishes were garlic bread and Greek salad made with crisp and fresh vegetables, which together with the main entrée made for a satisfying dinner.

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Meet The Photographer: Ricardo Vacas

Ricardo VacasRicardo Vacas

Ricardo Vacas, owner of the firm Kerp Photography, always showed intense interest in many forms of creative arts. His professional photography career started in his home country, Spain, where he was the official photographer of several music bands, models and clothing brands. He decided to move to Wellington, New Zealand in 2012, knowing his real interest was fashion photography more than any other field. Currently living in Vancouver, Canada, he now combines his fashion, editorial and commercial photography projects with regular trips to Europe and USA.

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Parking in Vancouver: Parking Spots, By-laws

One of the major problems that drivers in Vancouver encounter is the lack of parking spots. Vancouver has a limited number of parking spaces compared to the number of vehicles on the road each day. It is important to be aware of the City’s rules and regulations when it comes to parking on city streets both to avoid a fine and also upset neighbours. There are different rules depending on whether there are signs on the street or if you are at a meter.

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Parking Regulations and Bylaws

All of the City’s parking meters run from 9 a.m. until 10 p.m. every day (including holidays). Many residents are unaware of the three-hour bylaw that states you cannot remain parked in front of a property you don’t own or live at for more than three hours. It is in effect between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. daily.

Another regulation to pay attention to is parking near a fire hydrant; there must be at least five meters between the hydrant and the car.

Drivers are also not allowed to idle a vehicle for more than three consecutive minutes per hour or while there is no one in the vehicle and it is unlocked. There are several others regulations about parking on the City website.

 

Parking Apps

There are two major smartphone apps that help find and manage parking on Vancouver streets. The first app is Easy Park app, by a City-owned, not-for-profit parking company. Drivers can find lot locations, entrance locations and rates. You can also pay from your phone as well as extend your parking time when you are away from your vehicle. Find it on Google Play and App Store.

The second app is Pay by Phone. It can be linked to your credit card and uses your license plate number to register you car for parking. It can be used at meters around Vancouver and also some lots. The app will send you a text message when the time is nearly done. Users can extend the time from the app. Pay by Phone is available for Apple, Android and Blackberry phones.

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Referendum Rejected

With an average of 870,000 vehicles on Metro Vancouver roads daily and just 10,000-metered parking spots plus about 17,550 at Easy Park lots the city faces a challenge.

Add to that the expectation that there will be 170,000 new residents by 2045 the City needs to advance a plan to ease the congestion. Because there is a shortage of land in Vancouver it is easier to make the transit system more efficient and more attractive rather than try and increase the available parking spots. This is the problem the Mayors Council Plan hopes to help by promising to reduce the traffic problem by 20 per cent.

The plan largely focuses on improving the region’s public transportation system including an expansion to the Millennium Line along Broadway from Commercial Drive and UBC. It will also add five new b-lines to the roughly 210 bus routes it already has. The new routes have been defined as:

  • Downtown to SFU via Hastings Street;
  • Downtown to SE Marine Drive via Victoria Drive and Commercial Drive;
  • Downtown to Lynn Valley Centre in N Vancouver by West Georgia Street;
  • Joyce-Collingwood Station to UBC along 41st Ave;
  • Southeast Vancouver to Richmond and Burnaby via Knight Street.

The plan also commits to increasing sea bus service by 50 per cent.

However, residents essentially voted against funding the plan by rejecting a tax that would have covered the cost of the project in a 2015 referendum. Elections BC website records a total of 61.68 per cent of voters against the tax while 38.32 per cent supported it. Reports state the tax would have been a 0.5 per cent sales tax and revenue was expected to cover the $7.5 billion of in projects. It would have helped pay for some of the 10-year plan, which included an east-west subway line, a light rail system for Surrey that would reach to Langley and 11 new rapid bus lines in the suburbs, as well as a third harbour ferry.

Matt Taylor, a Master’s of Engineering Student at UBC has outlined the transportation problem in Vancouver in a YouTube video. He estimates there will be about 1,100,000 new residents in Vancouver. Which will mean an addition of 730,000 vehicles "at current ownership rates."

Taylor said that with that amount of growth the city would need an addition 2,200,000 more parking spaces. Due to the lack of land in the city most of the spots would need to be built underground. At a cost of $40,000 per spot Taylor said that would be a total cost of $90,000,000.

While Vancouver’s transit system is robust, the City estimates about 50 per cent of trips are done by walking, cycling or using public transit.

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Conclusion

Although Vancouver has a reliable public transportation system many families still feel the need for at least one vehicle. Given that residents voted against implementing a tax to improve the system it is likely to assume that they will be relying more on their vehicles to get around. Yet, with the estimated population growth in the next 20 years the City will find itself unprepared for the increase in traffic flow and need for ample parking in public areas and streets.

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